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Author Topic: Spirit of St Louis
fdobcy
Post Captain
Member # 3039

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89 years ago May 20/1927, Lindbergh's flight "Spirit of St Louis" T/O from Roosevelt Field, Long Island to Paris Le Bourget (LFBG)...
best rgds from France marc

Posts: 163 | From: France  |  IP: Logged
Capn Eddie Ricketyback
Post Captain
Member # 3010

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Charles Lindgergh took a helluva chance
When he flew for the first time to France.
When his fame was diminished
By TWA it was replenished
Then everyone knew him at first glance.
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Posts: 328 | From: South Carolina  |  IP: Logged
fdobcy
Post Captain
Member # 3039

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Following rcvd from Steve Forte (former Gal Manager France)
quote
Marc, I live about 300 meters from Roosevelt Field (now a big shopping center) from where Lindbergh took off.
Also, in my neighborhood is The Garden City Hotel where he spent the night before his flight. The hotel is an upscale hotel today and has kept the original clock tower through its renovations.
Regards
Steve
unquote

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extwacaptain
Prop Wash
Member # 381

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Betcha everyone on this board remembers all the details of Lindbergh’s flight to Paris, (many of which, to be honest, have fallen from my memory). For this reason, the attached reference was found useful in an attempt to appear “somewhat aware of our aviation history”.

The fact (?) that he flew ten (10) feet above the water, at one point, to remain alert was most interesting. Fortunately, TWA did not adopt this policy for our overseas operation in later years.
(Ringing for a F/A and a cup of coffee or a good cigar was a more acceptable and approved policy by our Captain Frankum....Well, okay, maybe not the cigar bit.)

All of us will have to agree that to fly such a distance and remain so close to desired course with such primitive navigational aids and procedures was truly most remarkable. In the mid-1940’s, to not deviate more than a couple of miles was considered pretty good navigation.

Thanks, “Lindy” for paving the way for TWA.


signed: an ex-pilot/navigator


http://charleslindbergh.com/history/timeline.asp

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Bob Willcutts
Post Captain
Member # 434

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Here is a four part video of that event.

Click Here

Posts: 141 | From: Cabot, VT, USA  |  IP: Logged
Subsonic Transport
Post Captain
Member # 2139

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Only to cause a slight diversion, the other day while traveling to RSW, I was sitting in ATL Terminal A food court. I look out the window and a DL757 was in view. I looked at the "N" number and was happy to see N723TW.

I looked up its skd for the day and was surprised to see that it was going to STL. That put a smile on my face. It was nice to see that former TWA a/c are still going to STL.

I wonder if anybody in STL that day, noticed its arrival and departure and took a moment to watch it.

Posts: 498 | From: Buffalo, NY  |  IP: Logged
extwacaptain
Prop Wash
Member # 381

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quote:
Originally posted by extwacaptain:



All of us will have to agree that to fly such a distance and remain so close to desired course with such primitive navigational aids and procedures was truly most remarkable. In the mid-1940’s, to not deviate more than a couple of miles was considered pretty good navigation.

http://charleslindbergh.com/history/timeline.asp

_______________________________________


P.S.
A little “digging reveals the following information regarding the route from New York to Paris during the two days of “Lucky” Lindy’s flight. According to National Aeronautics Association, the pressure distribution over the Atlantic on those two days was such that the “net wind drift was zero”, adding that this was the first time such unusual weather conditions have been recorded by weather experts.

Posts: 1157 | From: Encino, Ca. U.S.A.  |  IP: Logged


 
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